Popular culture and media coverage of shark attacks gave sharks a fearsome reputation. But technically, you’re more likely to be killed by lighting or faulty wiring while setting up your Christmas tree than by a shark. Sharks’ fearsome reputation is undeserved. We share the water with sharks regularly with little effect. Here is our top 10 sharks we want to see when diving.

10. Great White shark

COMMON NAME: Great White Shark

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Carcharodon carcharias

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

SIZE: 15 feet to more than 20 feet

WEIGHT: 2.5 tons or more

 Due to the Movie Jaws The Great White is known to be a man eater. But her diet is mainly fatty and protein – filled sea creatures such as seals and sea lions. It is because they hunt more by sight then any other shark that they ocasionaly mistake a human on the surface as a seal.  So don’t be afraid to dive with the great White.

Dive destination: Neptune Island (South Australia), Isla Guadelupe (Mexico), Gans baai (South Africa), Stewart Island (New Zealand), Tiger Beach (Bahamas).

9. Hammerhead Sharks

COMMON NAME: Hammerhead Sharks

SCIENTIFIC NAMESphyrnidae

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: 20 to 30 years

SIZE: 13 to 20 feet

WEIGHT: 500 to 1,000 pounds

 One of the most evocative animal of our seas, the hammerhead shark is known famously for its flat head and beguile movement. Travelling in groups, these gentle creatures are no strangers to the human presence. Feasting on large pray such as fish, squid, octupus and crustaceans and stingrays, these beautiful beasts are a site to behold for pelagic divers.

Dive destination: Socorro Island (Mexico), Cocos Island (Costa Rica), Rangiroa (French Polynesia), Bimini (Bahamas), and Galapagos Islands (Ecuador).

8. Tiger Shark

COMMON NAME: Tiger Shark

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Galeocerdo cuvier

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: 15 or more years

SIZE: 10 to 14 feet

WEIGHT: 850 to 1,400 pounds

 Hunting only at night, this fearsome creature is a great companion during the day. Despite their size and looks, this apex predator mostly feasts on a wide variety of marine species from crustaceans and squid, to sea turtles and sea snakes, as well as dolphins, smaller sharks, seals, and birds, and, of course, fish. This makes them one of the best sharks to dive with.

Dive destination: Bahamas, Fiji, Mexico, French Polynesia, Maldives, and Hawaii

7. Oceanic Whitetip Shark

COMMON NAME: oceanic white-tipped whaler or  whitetip shark

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Carcharhinus longimanus

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: Upto 19 years

SIZE: 9.8 to 13 feet

WEIGHT: 202-370 pounds

Typically solitary in nature, the Oceanic Whitetip Shark gets together with others when it comes to feeding. Going for stingrays, sea turtles, threadfins, tuna, dolphin fish, crustaceans and birds, this apex predator hardly every gives a glance on humans. A resident of Cat Island, this shark has become quite accustomed to human interaction. Despite the intimidating and dangerous look it gives, it is, in fact, quite docile and curious.

Dive destination: Bahamas, Egypt, Tanzania, Micronesia, Polynesia & Mexico

6. Nurse Sharks

COMMON NAME: Cat Shark

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Ginglymostoma cirratum

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: Upto 25 years

SIZE: 10 to 15 feet

WEIGHT: 730 pounds

Nurse Sharks are considered like the couch potatoes of the ocean. Even though they are savage predators, they hunt their prey along the bottom of the ocean in shallow waters. Nurse Sharks just attacks human when they have been directly antagonized and have to protect themselves. There have only been 5 nurse shark attacks reported and all have been non-fatal. Nurse sharks present no threat to new drivers and snorkelers but always remember not to hurt this cute ocean’s couch potatoes.

Dive destination: Maldives, Australia, Bahamas, Mexico, Philippines, and Costa Rica

5. Leopard Sharks

COMMON NAME: Leopard Sharks

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Triakis semifasciata

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: 7 to 13 years

SIZE: 2.3 to 4.3 feet

WEIGHT: 22 pounds

Even though Leopard sharks hang out in the same shallow waters human often swim in, they pose no threat to humanity. There haven’t been reports of a Leopard Shark attacking a person. These bottom dwellers swim along the ocean floor to hunt crabs and small fish. Leopard Sharks are shy creatures, they swim away when they encounter humans.

Dive destination: Thailand, Myanmar, Maldives, Indonesia, North America & Mexico

4. Lemon Shark

COMMON NAME: Lemon Shark

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Negaprion brevirostris

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: Upto 27  years

SIZE: Upto 11 feet

WEIGHT: 220 pounds

Sturdy and powerful, this beautiful beast grows up to 3 meters. Though at a first glance its silhouette can have you fooled for its more aggressive cousins, this gentle creature wears a yellow coat all over its body making it easily distinguishable up close.

These shark Occupy shallow reefs and mangrove areas. the lemon shark feasts on bony fish including: catfish, mullet, jacks, croakers, porcupine fish, and cowfish; as well as guitarfish, stingrays, eagle rays, crabs, and crayfish. On occasion lemon sharks will also eat sea birds and smaller sharks. Diving with this type of shark is definitely worth every minute especially when you see fish swimming just underneath its underside.

Dive destination: Mexico, Brazil, Central America & West Africa.

3. Blue Sharks

COMMON NAME: Blue Sharks

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Prionace glauca

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: Upto 20 years

SIZE: 6 to 12 feet

WEIGHT: 132 to 267 pounds

 Scavengers of the shark family, the blue shark migrates through the water of the Atlantic, United Kingdom and Newfoundland. Sticking as far away from the shoreline as possible, this pelagic creature poses no threat to humans. And though they might not have as much interaction or exposure to humans, they are quite docile even to divers. Also, this magnificent creature feeds mostly on squid, cuttlefish and pelagic octopuses, lobsters, shrimps, crabs, a large number of bony fishes, small sharks, mammalian carrion and occasional sea birds

Dive destination: England & South America.

2. Thresher Shark

COMMON NAME: Thresher Shark

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Alopias vulpinus

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: Upto 22 years

SIZE: 10 to 20 feet

WEIGHT: Upto 1100 pounds

Despite the scary sounding name, this cute creature is actually pretty docile towards divers and other humans it comes in contact with. Found in both shallow and pelagic waters it feeds on squids, octopuses, crustaceans, and pelagic schooling fish, as well as mackerel, bluefish, needlefish, lanternfish, and juvenile tuna

Dive destination: North America & South East Asia

1. Wobbegong Sharks

COMMON NAME: Wobbegong

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Orectolobidae

TYPE: Fish

DIET: Carnivore

GROUP NAME: School, shoal

AVERAGE LIFE SPAN IN THE WILD: Only 2 years

SIZE: 9 to 10 feet

WEIGHT: Upto 154 pounds

Found in the depths of the sea, this member of the shark family poses no risk to divers whatsoever. As funny as their name is, this fascinating creature sports on quite a fascinating look as well. Also known as carpet sharks they explore the bedroom floor chasing after bottom-dwelling fishes, smaller sharks, crabs, lobsters and even octopuses, giving them a quick snap before disappearing into the background.

Dive destination: Indonesia (Raja Ampat), Australia, Western Queensland, China & Japan.

The deep dark ocean is a world in its own to fathom and explore. With creatures unbeknownst to man, it comes as no surprise that thrill with traveling the depths of the sea is nothing like any other. All the more when it comes to diving with sharks.

Misunderstood and barely holding on for the presence of their kind on this planet, sharks are not as dangerous as we put them out to be. In fact, there are more to these mighty predators than we actually give them credit for.

  • Here’s a bonus information for you “8 Tips On How To Scuba Dive With Sharks”