Lady Denok

LADY DENOK Liveaboard; PARADISE EXISTS IN THE INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO.

Lady Denok liveaboard was created and custom crafted by the Konjo, world-renowned master boat builders from South Sulawesi. This elegant wooden Phinisi schooner has a length of 28 meters and is equipped with the latest marine technology and safety features.

Lady Denok lets you discover Indonesia’s most excellent scuba diving sites at friendly prices without cutting down on comfort. Trips vary from 6 to 11 days. We cater to 12 guests. Our destinations include Raja Ampat, Komodo islands, Flores, Bangai, and the Forgotten Islands.

Accommodation

Onboard, Lady Denok has seven air-conditioned cabins with private bathrooms and plenty of storage facilities. Wooden paneling and portholes create a yacht-like ambiance.

There are two single cabins (8 sqm), two twin cabins (10sqm), two double cabins (12sqm), and one master cabin (25sqm) on offer.

Daily housekeeping and provision of toiletries and soft towels are part of the service. Laundry service is provided at a small fee.

Twin Cabin

Twin Cabin

Room size: 10 m²
Max. occupancy: 2
Beds: 2 Single
Private bathroom: 1
Air conditioning: 1
WiFi in the room:
Twin/Double Cabin

Twin/Double Cabin

Room size: 12 m²
Max. occupancy: 2
Beds: Double or 2 Single
Private bathroom: 1
Air conditioning: 1
WiFi in the room:
Single Cabin

Single Cabin

Room size: 8 m²
Max. occupancy: 1
Beds: Single
Private bathroom: 1
Air conditioning: 1
WiFi in the room:
Master Cabin

Master Cabin

Room size: 25 m²
Max. occupancy: 2
Beds: Double
Private bathroom: 1
Air conditioning: 1
WiFi in the room:

Comfort

Our friendly crew of 9 speaks English. They are always at your service. The well-appointed saloon is the place for audio &video entertainment and access to free internet.

The leisure deck is equipped with sunbeds and an awning for those who enjoy the shade, perfect for après dive relaxation.

Catering

Breakfast and lunch are served as a buffet. Dinner is à la carte. Lady Denok kitchen will surprise you with healthy and delicious Indonesian, Asian and European cuisine and delightful snacks.

You can choose to eat in the saloon or the open-air dining area. You can order beer, wine, and spirits from the bar. Soft drinks and juices are complimentary.

If you have specific dietetic requests, please let us know at the time of your booking.

Diving

Submerge yourself in a serene world of colors and be overwhelmed and mesmerized by the coral reefs and marine life. Have a rendezvous with manta rays, dolphins, and sharks or go muck diving and let your dive guide point out small critters as the pygmy seahorse or frogfishes. Indonesia has it all. Our highly-trained dive masters will guide and support you in every possible way.

Lady Denok has a custom-built dive deck with fresh (desalinated) water rinse tanks and warm water showers. Each diver can choose to dive with either air or nitrox.

We have a low-cost rental service for all diving and snorkeling gear, including dive torches and dive computers.

A tender will bring you from the dive platform to the site of your choice. The ship is equipped with a camera workstation with table and charging stations. Kayaking is offered as an additional activity.

SPECIFICATIONS

Year built: 2015

Length: 28 meters

Beam: 7 meters

Top speed: 12 knots

Cruising speed: 7 – 8 knots

Engines: Yanmar 350 HP

Max guests: 12

Number of cabins: 7

Number of bathrooms: 8

Tenders: 1 Yamaha 40 HP 1 RIB Yamaha 40 HP

Water capacity: 6000 liters

Fuel capacity: 5000 liters

Freshwater maker: 6000 liters per day

NAVIGATION, COMMUNICATION, AND SAFETY FEATURES

 Radar

 Depth Sounder

 GPS

 Radio VHF/DSC/SSB

 E.P.I.R.B. Distress System

 Emergency Rafts

 Life Vests

 Fire Alarm & Fire Extinguishers

 Oxygen

 First Aid Kits

 Fishfinder

 Satellite & mobile phones

 Crew trained in first aid

 Emergency flares

Lady Denok is a traditional crafted phinsi liveaboard that offers 5 -11 days dive safaris to Indonesia's best diving destinations.

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13 May 2021
Komodo (Labuan Bajo - Labuan Bajo)
Arrival: 13 May 2021
Departure: 17 May 2021
Days/nights: 5 Days / 4 Nights
Komodo (Labuan Bajo - Labuan Bajo)

Komodo is one of the 17,508 islands that compose the Republic of Indonesia. The island is particularly notable as the Komodo dragon’s habitat, the largest lizard on Earth, which is named after the island. Komodo Island has a surface area of 390 square kilometers and a human population of over two thousand. The island people are descendants of former convicts who were exiled to the island and who have mixed with Bugis from Sulawesi. The people are primarily adherents of Islam, but there are also Christian and Hindu congregations.

Komodo is part of the Lesser Sunda chain of islands and forms part of the Komodo National Park. Besides, the island is a popular destination for diving. Administratively, it is part of the East Nusa Tenggara province.

The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), also known as the Komodo monitor, is a large lizard species found in the Indonesian islands of Komodo, Rinca, Flores, Gili Motang, and Padar. A member of the monitor lizard family, Varanidae, is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum length of 3 meters (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb).

Their enormous size has been attributed to island gigantism since no other carnivorous animals fill the niche on the islands where they live. However, recent research suggests the large size of Komodo dragons may be better understood as representative of a relict population of giant varanid lizards that once lived across Indonesia and Australia, most of which, along with another megafauna, died out after the Pleistocene. Fossils very similar to V. komodonesis have been found in Australia dating to greater than 3.8 million years ago. Its body size remained stable on Flores, one of the handfuls of Indonesian islands where it is currently found, over the last 900,000 years, “a time marked by major faunal turnovers, extinction of the island`s megafauna, and the arrival of early hominids by 880 ka [kiloannums].

As a result of their size, these lizards dominate the ecosystems in which they live. Komodo dragons hunt and ambush prey, including invertebrates, birds, and mammals. It has been claimed that they have a venomous bite; there are two glands in the lower jaw which secrete several toxic proteins. The biological significance of these proteins is disputed, but the glands have been shown to secrete an anticoagulant. Komodo dragon group behavior in hunting is exceptional in the reptile world. The diet of big Komodo dragons mainly consists of deer, though they also eat big carrion. Komodo dragons again occasionally attack humans in West Manggarai Regency, where they live in Indonesia.

Mating begins between May and August, and the eggs are laid in September. About 20 eggs are deposited in abandoned megapode nests or a self-dug nesting hole. The eggs are incubated for seven to eight months, hatching in April, when insects are most plentiful. Young Komodo dragons are vulnerable and therefore dwell in trees, safe from predators and cannibalistic adults. They take 8 to 9 years to mature and are estimated to live up to 30 years.

Komodo dragons were first recorded by Western scientists in 1910. Their large size and fearsome reputation make them popular zoo exhibits. Their range has contracted due to human activities in the wild, and they are listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. They are protected under Indonesian law, and a national park, Komodo National Park, was founded to aid protection efforts.

Day 1

  • Lady Denok crew will transfer the Guests from Labuan Bajo Airport or Hotel to the ship. After a nice Welcome briefing by our Cruise Director, cabin allocation and ship orientation will take place – before embarking on Labuan Bajo. Guests can familiarize themselves with the vessel, set up equipment, and get comfortable.

Day 2 – 8

  • We offer 3-4 dives daily, including a night dive if possible. When crossing, only two dives a day can be scheduled.

Day 9

  • On the final day of diving with 1-2 scheduled dives – we are sailing towards Labuan Bajo.

Day 10

  • After breakfast and check-out, we start preparing for disembarkation in Labuan Bajo. We say goodbye to our guests and wish them farewell! Lady Denok crew will organize the transfer to the Airport and assist at check-in for onward flights.

Marine Life: Bumphead parrotfish, bamboo sharks, marble rays, nudibranchs, dusky sharks, jawfish, bubble coral shrimps, leaf fish, porcelain crabs, pygmy seahorses, schools of barracudas, trevally, and mackerel, white tips, black tips, grey reef sharks, turtles, octopus, frogfish, manta rays, dugong, banded pipefishes, mandarin fishes, Wonderpus, Indian Walkman

The above is sample trip itineraries, subject to changes depending on the actual dive location.

19 May 2021
Komodo (Labuan Bajo - Labuan Bajo)
Arrival: 19 May 2021
Departure: 29 May 2021
Days/nights: 11 Days / 10 Nights
Komodo (Labuan Bajo - Labuan Bajo)

Komodo is one of the 17,508 islands that compose the Republic of Indonesia. The island is particularly notable as the Komodo dragon’s habitat, the largest lizard on Earth, which is named after the island. Komodo Island has a surface area of 390 square kilometers and a human population of over two thousand. The island people are descendants of former convicts who were exiled to the island and who have mixed with Bugis from Sulawesi. The people are primarily adherents of Islam, but there are also Christian and Hindu congregations.

Komodo is part of the Lesser Sunda chain of islands and forms part of the Komodo National Park. Besides, the island is a popular destination for diving. Administratively, it is part of the East Nusa Tenggara province.

The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), also known as the Komodo monitor, is a large lizard species found in the Indonesian islands of Komodo, Rinca, Flores, Gili Motang, and Padar. A member of the monitor lizard family, Varanidae, is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum length of 3 meters (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb).

Their enormous size has been attributed to island gigantism since no other carnivorous animals fill the niche on the islands where they live. However, recent research suggests the large size of Komodo dragons may be better understood as representative of a relict population of giant varanid lizards that once lived across Indonesia and Australia, most of which, along with another megafauna, died out after the Pleistocene. Fossils very similar to V. komodonesis have been found in Australia dating to greater than 3.8 million years ago. Its body size remained stable on Flores, one of the handfuls of Indonesian islands where it is currently found, over the last 900,000 years, “a time marked by major faunal turnovers, extinction of the island`s megafauna, and the arrival of early hominids by 880 ka [kiloannums].

As a result of their size, these lizards dominate the ecosystems in which they live. Komodo dragons hunt and ambush prey, including invertebrates, birds, and mammals. It has been claimed that they have a venomous bite; there are two glands in the lower jaw which secrete several toxic proteins. The biological significance of these proteins is disputed, but the glands have been shown to secrete an anticoagulant. Komodo dragon group behavior in hunting is exceptional in the reptile world. The diet of big Komodo dragons mainly consists of deer, though they also eat big carrion. Komodo dragons again occasionally attack humans in West Manggarai Regency, where they live in Indonesia.

Mating begins between May and August, and the eggs are laid in September. About 20 eggs are deposited in abandoned megapode nests or a self-dug nesting hole. The eggs are incubated for seven to eight months, hatching in April, when insects are most plentiful. Young Komodo dragons are vulnerable and therefore dwell in trees, safe from predators and cannibalistic adults. They take 8 to 9 years to mature and are estimated to live up to 30 years.

Komodo dragons were first recorded by Western scientists in 1910. Their large size and fearsome reputation make them popular zoo exhibits. Their range has contracted due to human activities in the wild, and they are listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. They are protected under Indonesian law, and a national park, Komodo National Park, was founded to aid protection efforts.

Day 1

  • Lady Denok crew will transfer the Guests from Labuan Bajo Airport or Hotel to the ship. After a nice Welcome briefing by our Cruise Director, cabin allocation and ship orientation will take place – before embarking on Labuan Bajo. Guests can familiarize themselves with the vessel, set up equipment, and get comfortable.

Day 2 – 8

  • We offer 3-4 dives daily, including a night dive if possible. When crossing, only two dives a day can be scheduled.

Day 9

  • On the final day of diving with 1-2 scheduled dives – we are sailing towards Labuan Bajo.

Day 10

  • After breakfast and check-out, we start preparing for disembarkation in Labuan Bajo. We say goodbye to our guests and wish them farewell! Lady Denok crew will organize the transfer to the Airport and assist at check-in for onward flights.

Marine Life: Bumphead parrotfish, bamboo sharks, marble rays, nudibranchs, dusky sharks, jawfish, bubble coral shrimps, leaf fish, porcelain crabs, pygmy seahorses, schools of barracudas, trevally, and mackerel, white tips, black tips, grey reef sharks, turtles, octopus, frogfish, manta rays, dugong, banded pipefishes, mandarin fishes, Wonderpus, Indian Walkman

The above is sample trip itineraries, subject to changes depending on the actual dive location.

03 Jun 2021
Komodo (Labuan Bajo - Labuan Bajo)
Arrival: 03 Jun 2021
Departure: 11 Jun 2021
Days/nights: 9 Days / 8 Nights
Komodo (Labuan Bajo - Labuan Bajo)

Komodo is one of the 17,508 islands that compose the Republic of Indonesia. The island is particularly notable as the Komodo dragon’s habitat, the largest lizard on Earth, which is named after the island. Komodo Island has a surface area of 390 square kilometers and a human population of over two thousand. The island people are descendants of former convicts who were exiled to the island and who have mixed with Bugis from Sulawesi. The people are primarily adherents of Islam, but there are also Christian and Hindu congregations.

Komodo is part of the Lesser Sunda chain of islands and forms part of the Komodo National Park. Besides, the island is a popular destination for diving. Administratively, it is part of the East Nusa Tenggara province.

The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), also known as the Komodo monitor, is a large lizard species found in the Indonesian islands of Komodo, Rinca, Flores, Gili Motang, and Padar. A member of the monitor lizard family, Varanidae, is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum length of 3 meters (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb).

Their enormous size has been attributed to island gigantism since no other carnivorous animals fill the niche on the islands where they live. However, recent research suggests the large size of Komodo dragons may be better understood as representative of a relict population of giant varanid lizards that once lived across Indonesia and Australia, most of which, along with another megafauna, died out after the Pleistocene. Fossils very similar to V. komodonesis have been found in Australia dating to greater than 3.8 million years ago. Its body size remained stable on Flores, one of the handfuls of Indonesian islands where it is currently found, over the last 900,000 years, “a time marked by major faunal turnovers, extinction of the island`s megafauna, and the arrival of early hominids by 880 ka [kiloannums].

As a result of their size, these lizards dominate the ecosystems in which they live. Komodo dragons hunt and ambush prey, including invertebrates, birds, and mammals. It has been claimed that they have a venomous bite; there are two glands in the lower jaw which secrete several toxic proteins. The biological significance of these proteins is disputed, but the glands have been shown to secrete an anticoagulant. Komodo dragon group behavior in hunting is exceptional in the reptile world. The diet of big Komodo dragons mainly consists of deer, though they also eat big carrion. Komodo dragons again occasionally attack humans in West Manggarai Regency, where they live in Indonesia.

Mating begins between May and August, and the eggs are laid in September. About 20 eggs are deposited in abandoned megapode nests or a self-dug nesting hole. The eggs are incubated for seven to eight months, hatching in April, when insects are most plentiful. Young Komodo dragons are vulnerable and therefore dwell in trees, safe from predators and cannibalistic adults. They take 8 to 9 years to mature and are estimated to live up to 30 years.

Komodo dragons were first recorded by Western scientists in 1910. Their large size and fearsome reputation make them popular zoo exhibits. Their range has contracted due to human activities in the wild, and they are listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. They are protected under Indonesian law, and a national park, Komodo National Park, was founded to aid protection efforts.

Day 1

  • Lady Denok crew will transfer the Guests from Labuan Bajo Airport or Hotel to the ship. After a nice Welcome briefing by our Cruise Director, cabin allocation and ship orientation will take place – before embarking on Labuan Bajo. Guests can familiarize themselves with the vessel, set up equipment, and get comfortable.

Day 2 – 8

  • We offer 3-4 dives daily, including a night dive if possible. When crossing, only two dives a day can be scheduled.

Day 9

  • On the final day of diving with 1-2 scheduled dives – we are sailing towards Labuan Bajo.

Day 10

  • After breakfast and check-out, we start preparing for disembarkation in Labuan Bajo. We say goodbye to our guests and wish them farewell! Lady Denok crew will organize the transfer to the Airport and assist at check-in for onward flights.

Marine Life: Bumphead parrotfish, bamboo sharks, marble rays, nudibranchs, dusky sharks, jawfish, bubble coral shrimps, leaf fish, porcelain crabs, pygmy seahorses, schools of barracudas, trevally, and mackerel, white tips, black tips, grey reef sharks, turtles, octopus, frogfish, manta rays, dugong, banded pipefishes, mandarin fishes, Wonderpus, Indian Walkman

The above is sample trip itineraries, subject to changes depending on the actual dive location.

14 Jun 2021
Komodo (Labuan Bajo - Labuan Bajo)
Arrival: 14 Jun 2021
Departure: 19 Jun 2021
Days/nights: 6 Days / 5 Nights
Komodo (Labuan Bajo - Labuan Bajo)

Komodo is one of the 17,508 islands that compose the Republic of Indonesia. The island is particularly notable as the Komodo dragon’s habitat, the largest lizard on Earth, which is named after the island. Komodo Island has a surface area of 390 square kilometers and a human population of over two thousand. The island people are descendants of former convicts who were exiled to the island and who have mixed with Bugis from Sulawesi. The people are primarily adherents of Islam, but there are also Christian and Hindu congregations.

Komodo is part of the Lesser Sunda chain of islands and forms part of the Komodo National Park. Besides, the island is a popular destination for diving. Administratively, it is part of the East Nusa Tenggara province.

The Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), also known as the Komodo monitor, is a large lizard species found in the Indonesian islands of Komodo, Rinca, Flores, Gili Motang, and Padar. A member of the monitor lizard family, Varanidae, is the largest living species of lizard, growing to a maximum length of 3 meters (10 ft) in rare cases and weighing up to approximately 70 kilograms (150 lb).

Their enormous size has been attributed to island gigantism since no other carnivorous animals fill the niche on the islands where they live. However, recent research suggests the large size of Komodo dragons may be better understood as representative of a relict population of giant varanid lizards that once lived across Indonesia and Australia, most of which, along with another megafauna, died out after the Pleistocene. Fossils very similar to V. komodonesis have been found in Australia dating to greater than 3.8 million years ago. Its body size remained stable on Flores, one of the handfuls of Indonesian islands where it is currently found, over the last 900,000 years, “a time marked by major faunal turnovers, extinction of the island`s megafauna, and the arrival of early hominids by 880 ka [kiloannums].

As a result of their size, these lizards dominate the ecosystems in which they live. Komodo dragons hunt and ambush prey, including invertebrates, birds, and mammals. It has been claimed that they have a venomous bite; there are two glands in the lower jaw which secrete several toxic proteins. The biological significance of these proteins is disputed, but the glands have been shown to secrete an anticoagulant. Komodo dragon group behavior in hunting is exceptional in the reptile world. The diet of big Komodo dragons mainly consists of deer, though they also eat big carrion. Komodo dragons again occasionally attack humans in West Manggarai Regency, where they live in Indonesia.

Mating begins between May and August, and the eggs are laid in September. About 20 eggs are deposited in abandoned megapode nests or a self-dug nesting hole. The eggs are incubated for seven to eight months, hatching in April, when insects are most plentiful. Young Komodo dragons are vulnerable and therefore dwell in trees, safe from predators and cannibalistic adults. They take 8 to 9 years to mature and are estimated to live up to 30 years.

Komodo dragons were first recorded by Western scientists in 1910. Their large size and fearsome reputation make them popular zoo exhibits. Their range has contracted due to human activities in the wild, and they are listed as vulnerable by the IUCN. They are protected under Indonesian law, and a national park, Komodo National Park, was founded to aid protection efforts.

Day 1

  • Lady Denok crew will transfer the Guests from Labuan Bajo Airport or Hotel to the ship. After a nice Welcome briefing by our Cruise Director, cabin allocation and ship orientation will take place – before embarking on Labuan Bajo. Guests can familiarize themselves with the vessel, set up equipment, and get comfortable.

Day 2 – 8

  • We offer 3-4 dives daily, including a night dive if possible. When crossing, only two dives a day can be scheduled.

Day 9

  • On the final day of diving with 1-2 scheduled dives – we are sailing towards Labuan Bajo.

Day 10

  • After breakfast and check-out, we start preparing for disembarkation in Labuan Bajo. We say goodbye to our guests and wish them farewell! Lady Denok crew will organize the transfer to the Airport and assist at check-in for onward flights.

Marine Life: Bumphead parrotfish, bamboo sharks, marble rays, nudibranchs, dusky sharks, jawfish, bubble coral shrimps, leaf fish, porcelain crabs, pygmy seahorses, schools of barracudas, trevally, and mackerel, white tips, black tips, grey reef sharks, turtles, octopus, frogfish, manta rays, dugong, banded pipefishes, mandarin fishes, Wonderpus, Indian Walkman

The above is sample trip itineraries, subject to changes depending on the actual dive location.

Included: VAT, Accommodation, Complimentary toiletries, Transfers/pickups from airport, Tanks, Weights, Belts, Divemaster services, All meals, Towels Provided, Transfers/pickups from hotel

Excluded: International and domestic airfare, Hotels and meals before and after the cruise, Alcoholic beverage, soft drinks, juice, Snorkel gear (available for rent from The Lady Denok), Administration/port clearance fee, Travel insurance, Obligatory Dive insurance, Onboard purchases, Private tours not included in the Lady Denok Program, National park entrance fees, Laundry, Tips for the crew (optional), dive equipment rental, Onboard telecommunications, Tipping, Port clearance, National Park Fees &Fuel Surcharges (between US$160 – $685 per person per trip)